Thursday, July 31, 2014

Tri It, You Will Like It (Part 2)

Okay, so perhaps you aren't a triathlete yet, and you saw my last post "Tri It, You Will Like It" and thought to yourself, "yes, I want to tri it!!"  But maybe you also thought, "I don't have the skills / time / running ability..." or "I'm not an athlete." Or some form of doubt crossed your mind about why maybe you weren't cut out to be a triathlete.  Well, let me put those fears to rest with a little bit of myth busting!

I can't swim:  You would be surprised at the number of triathletes that learn to swim as adults. I know a few who started out by taking swim lessons and barely being able to swim 25 meters, and within a year, they were swimming a 3k open water swim.  If you are just learning to swim, yes, it may not be wise to sign up for a race immediately, but you will get there! Afraid of swimming in open water?  There are always plenty of kayaks, boaters, etc. out on the course to help you and give you a break if you need it. They also make tools like this personal buoy to help give you confidence in the water. They also have triathlons that have pool swims!

I can't bike:  Neither could I when I first started.  Okay, yes, I rode a bike when I was a kid, but when I first started doing triathlons, it had been YEARS since I had ridden a bike (like at least 10 years, maybe 15). It might be a little scary at first (clipless pedals... eek!), but this is something you can learn!

I can't run:  There are tons of programs out there to help you get into running.  You don't have to run far. You don't have to run fast. You just have to get started.  You could start with a Try-a-Tri, which is usually around a 200m swim, 10k bike, and 2.5k run!  If you have a longstanding injury, you could always participate in triathlon relays!

I'm too old: Go Google Sister Madonna Buder.  Age is not a limit in triathlon.  Yes, they will write your age on the back of your leg and yes, those young guns will be able to see it when you pass them!

I'm too out of shape:  Triathletes come in all shapes and sizes! Side effects of triathlon may include a slowly shrinking waistline, increasing strength and endurance, and increasing happiness and self confidence. 

I'm too busy:  Not every triathlete trains for an Ironman.  There are plenty of race distances that are much more manageable in terms of the amount of time that you need to train.  I like the sprint distance myself (which is a good intro distance for anyone), and I train at the very peak about 6-8 hours a week, but most of the time, it is closer to 4-5 hours per week.  I know triathletes with full time jobs and small children and they manage to get their training done.  You can find a way to fit it in, I'm sure of it!  And it will help improve your time management skills too.

I'm too slow:  Who cares?  None of us are going to set a world record.  If you are near the back of the pack, that just means there are more people to cheer for you at the finish line!

One of the reasons I love triathlon is that there is something for everyone and the community of triathletes are welcoming and inclusive of newbies!!  Triathletes are always willing to share their experiences and help make you feel at ease.  I usually see people of all ages, sizes, and speeds at races.  You can do it too!  I dare ya to tri it! I really do think you will like it!

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Tri It, You Will Like It!

When I first started triathlons, I had no idea how much I would fall in love with the sport.  Now, I love everything about it - the training, the racing, and of course, the people I meet through the sport.  Chances are, that if you meet me or if you already know me, I will talk your ear off about how awesome triathlon is, because as much as I love triathlon, I want other people to love it too. So I'm here today to spread the gospel of triathlon, because I imagine that right now at least, most of my readers are my friends and family and not actually other triathletes...but that won't stop me from trying to convert you all into triathletes!

Here are my top 5 reasons why I think you should tri it:

1. Achieving Goals is AWESOME


I love setting goals and smashing them.  I can look back and feel proud of my hard work and be amazed at what my body is capable of doing.  You can also set goals and smash them, and I guarantee that you will feel those same feelings of pride and amazement. Warning though, you may also feel the urge to continue to set new goals and continue to challenge yourself to try new things once you've had a taste of how awesome it is to achieve your goals.

2. Triathletes are AWESOME, friendly, and fun


Exercise gives you endorphins, and endorphins make you happy.  Happy people are fun to hang out with!  I've found that triathletes are happy, goal-oriented, friendly, willing to share advice / experiences, and inspiring.  Join a triathlon club, running group, masters' swim team, or cycling group.  You're bound to meet people who are having fun and working hard to achieve their goals, and you're bound to make new friends!

 

3. Living a healthy lifestyle is good for you


Training for triathlons has a lot of physical and mental health benefits.  It will get you out, moving your body.  It will encourage you to make smarter choices in fueling your body, so that you have enough energy to train.  Triathlon is a lifestyle and it will help you build healthy habits for life.

4. Training helps you discover yourself


Triathletes typically spend at least a few hours a week training (maybe a lot of hours, depending on your race distance of choice), and those hours can be a great time for self-reflection and self-discovery.  I love losing myself in my thoughts and reflecting, especially when I'm running, so I try to make sure that I train alone sometimes so that I can have that peaceful time to myself.  Don't get me wrong, I love training with other people, and that can help you discover other things about yourself - your grit, determination, and perseverance for example.  But there is something magical about going out on a training run or swim and learning a little bit more about yourself in the process.

5. Training and racing helps you discover new places


My appreciation for my city has grown tremendously since I started training for triathlons.  It is amazing the places you will discover while you are out running or biking.  I've discovered the beauty of my city and surrounding area. I've discovered amazing cafes while out riding my bike in unfamiliar parts of town. You will see your city in a whole new way by foot or by bike, and you will begin to appreciate it more.  Beyond your own area, there are opportunities to discover new towns, cities, or even countries as you travel to races.  Of course these places may only be a 30 minute drive down the road, but I've discovered places I would have never been to if not for a race.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Training and Life Recap: Week of July 21

I'm going to do a weekly recap each Monday of what my training looked like the previous week. So here we go with the first one! This week was mostly a recovery week and I really had a hard time motivating myself to get back into training.

Monday: Rest Day!

Tuesday: Massage and sunset swim at Meech Lake



Wednesday: TTP with OTC- 20 minutes of strength, one hour on the bike, 20 minute run. We were in the studio for the strength and spin session, so no pictures.

Thursday: going away party for one of the barre girls, so another rest day

Friday: sangria and froyo with the roomie, instead of my run (its all about balance!)



Saturday: Open Water Swim "Championships" with the OTC.  There was a club aquathon after the OWS, but I had to leave to go teach a barre class. Plus an ice cream / pool party to celebrate a friend and a BBQ with some girlfriends.













Sunday: 25k ride in Gatineau Park in the rain (photo below is from when it finally cleared up a bit)! I left my helmet at home after driving out to the country, so I had to go all the way home before I could go ride.  Of course I chose the one part of the city where it was raining!  I also spent the day constantly refreshing the live results from IM Lake Placid, IM 70.3 Calgary, and IM Canada to see how my friends were doing!  In awe of the amazing displays of courage, determination and athleticism that is an Ironman race.





Friday, July 25, 2014

Training Schedule Update: Summer 2014 Olympic

I've decided to try my first Olympic distance triathlon in early September.  In order to get there, I really need to keep pushing the distance on my bike and run.  Here is the new schedule that I've made for myself between now and race day!

Olympic Triathlon Training Schedule - Summer 2014


Week
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
0 (7/14)
Taper!
Run (20)
Bike (20)
Swim (20)
Rest
S: 10
B: 10
R: 10
Race Day!!
Rest
1 (7/21)
Rest
Swim (20)
Bike (60)
Run (20)
Rest
Run (60)
Swim (1k time trial)
Bike (90)
2 (7/28)
Swim (60)
Run (45)
Bike (90)
Swim (40)
Rest
Bike (30)
Run (20)
Race Day
3 (8/4)
Rest
Run (45)
Bike (60)
Swim (60)
Run (90)
Rest
Bike (2:00)
4 (8/11)
Swim (30)
Run (40)
Bike (60)
Swim (30)
Rest
Bike (45)
Run (40)
5 (8/18)
Swim (60)
Run (45)
Bike (60)
Rest
Run (1:45)
Swim (60)
Bike (2:30)
6 (8/25)
Swim (60)
Run (45)
Bike (90)
Rest
Run (90)
Bike (2 hours)
Swim (60)
7 (9/1)
Race Week
Run (30)
Bike (60)
Swim (30)
Rest
S: 15
B: 15
R: 15
Race Day!



 

Thursday, July 24, 2014

My Happiness "Rules"

My blog title - the "Happy Triathlete"- is really important to me.  You see, I've learned a lot about happiness and how to be happy especially over the past year.  Happiness to me is a mindset and a way of travelling through life.  Happiness is a choice - it comes from the way we choose to react to situations, the way we choose to treat other people (and ourselves), and the way we choose to see the world.  I want to share a few of the things that I've learned and how they relate to regular life, but also to life as a triathlete. 

1) Don't sweat the small stuff:  If we let little things get to us, we aren't going to be happy.  I used to let every little thing annoy me, but I've learned to not sweat the small stuff, especially the stuff that is out of my control.  The less I worry about little things, the more I can focus on the awesome, amazing things in life.

2) Look for the good in every situation:  Life can be hard and we can face setbacks, disappointment, and tough times.  If we take each situation as a learning opportunity and look for the good, the silver lining as they say, we can move forward with more experience and more gratitude for the good times. Dwell on the positive, learn from the situation, and move on to the next experience! In triathlon, if you have a "bad" race, take the positives from it and learn from the things that didn't go exactly as you wanted them to, then apply them to your next race!

3) Give yourself a break!  This applies in several ways to your happiness.  One - if something isn't making you happy, take a break from it and evaluate whether you really need it in your life.  Two - if you are stressed, tired, cranky, or burnt out, give yourself some rest and rejuvenate your soul.  Three - Be kind to yourself, be gentle with yourself, and remember that you are human and not superman.

4) Celebrate the achievements of other people:  Be truly excited for the success of your friends and family.  Share in their excitement and happiness.  Encourage them to reach for their dreams! 

5) Smile as much as possible:  Smiling can automatically brighten your mood.  If you put on a smile, you will be hard pressed to continue to feel down or disappointed about a situation.  Find a reason to smile and find reasons to make others smile. In triathlon, smile during your race, smile at the spectators and the volunteers to forget the pain!

6) Wake up each day with a grateful heart! Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life.  Wake up each day grateful to be alive and to have the opportunity to experience another new day.  The more you express your gratitude, the more things you will find to be grateful for.

7) Tie yourself to a goal, not to people or objects (to paraphrase Albert Einstein):  Having a goal to work toward gives us a sense of purpose and challenges us.  Do the things that you love, chase after your dreams and the things that make you really feel like you are alive!

8) Remember that life is about having fun:  If you aren't having fun, you're doing it wrong.  Seek out the fun and try not to take life too seriously.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Transition Zone Set-up

T-Zone at Chicago ITU Age Group Races


Transitions can be a daunting part of triathlon.  In a sprint especially, the T-Zone is usually a blur of adrenaline, gear flying everywhere, and water dripping all over the place. Having everything you need, in an order that works for you, can help to calm things down and to make sure you don't forget something... like your race bib!  Here is what works for me:

  • Finding a spot in the T-Zone (if they don't have assigned spots) that has a unique marker.  In Magog, I chose row "H" for Hunter and I picked a spot next to the "H" marker.
  • Using a colorful towel to mark my spot and to keep everything organized. My towel has the Little Mermaid on it.
  • Bike shoes open (if you do a flying mount, then obviously this doesn't apply) and ready to slip on my feet. I put baby powder inside too to help dry my feet. These go in the front.
  • Helmet flipped upside down, with straps out, ready to put on.
  • Sunglasses open and ready to put on, inside my helmet.
  • Race bib attached to my race belt.  Unhooked and ready to put on.  Visible so it is the first thing I see, so I don't forget it.
  • Running shoes with bungee laces, already tightened. Baby powder inside and body glide along the spots that usually result in blisters (like the heel).
  • Multisport watch turned on and reset.
  • Running hat next to my running shoes.
  • One water bottle of cold water, one water bottle of Gatorade, and one that is a mixture (on my bike). Remember, I do sprints so don't have to worry about nutrition.
  • Bike in appropriate gears (check out the bike out and make sure it isn't uphill for example) and tires pumped.
  • Bike computer reset and ready to hit start (if you use one).


My other tips for smooth transitions:
  • Watch YouTube videos of transitions and T-Zone setup.
  • Practice, practice, practice.  Run through the steps that you would go through in an actual race.
  • If possible, find a triathlon clinic in your area to attend.  I went to one at the very beginning of my triathlon career and it made a huge difference.
  • Know the rules!  For example, you must have your helmet on and clasped before you are allowed to touch your bike.
  • Slow down a bit if you need to and always grab a sip of water in T-Zone - it takes seconds, but it will benefit you hugely on hot days!
  • Figure out what works for you :)

Monday, July 21, 2014

Canadian Nationals Race Report (Trimemphre de Magog Sprint)



AHHH!  Well, I did it!  I achieved my goal for the season of qualifying for the Canadian team for age group World Championships 2015!  I'm so excited, proud of my hard work, and thankful for all the support that I've received from my family, friends, teammates, and coaches!

Pre-Race:


The drive to Magog seemed to take FOREVER.  Traffic and construction through Montreal made my 3 hour 15 minute journey a nearly 5 hour journey.  But I made it to Magog in time to check my bike and pick up my race kit.  Then I drove the bike course... yikes!! Hills and super scary turns (at the bottom of hills)!  A curve with mattresses lining the ditch, you know, just in case.  As I drove to check-in to the B&B, I questioned my sanity and whether maybe I shouldn't do the race.  The bike has always been a source of fear for me and those twists and turns had my stomach twisting and turning.  But, we have to face our fears, right!?  So after checking into the B&B, I got dressed and drove back over to the bike course for a quick ride and run.  After only doing part of the course, but also the part with the mattress curve, I felt a little bit better and resolved to that the race must go on!  I changed and went out to find the restaurant that I had chosen for dinner. On the way, I ran into Lucie and her friend Catherine.  We chatted for a bit about the bike course, then I was off to dinner all by myself (definitely missed my support crew).  My dinner was Chicken Franchese (they wouldn't make me chicken parm) and salad.  After dinner, I went back to the B&B to pack my race bag, paint my nails (blue for the OTC), and watch "Dreams of Glory"!  The best part though was that my parents had sent me beautiful flowers to the B&B to wish me good luck!


Race Day:


The B&B that I stayed at was lovely, but I didn't really think about what breakfast meant, and I had planned to eat at the B&B.  My stomach was still really upset with me (nerves, stress, too many carbs?), so I didn't end up eating much of what the B&B served.  Feeling even more nervous, I decided to take a walk to see if I could find a place serving oatmeal.  No such luck.  So I went to the grocery store, bought a box of oatmeal packets, turned the water on as hot as it would go, and made oatmeal in my room.  Luckily, I remembered that I had a spoon in my car from the yogurt I ate on the way to watch Bring on the Bay (yes, I really should clean my car out!).  I added my Justin's maple almond butter and banana. Success! 

By that time it was almost 11, so I gathered my stuff and packed up the car.  I decided to leave my car by the B&B instead of trying to find parking by the race site, so I had a bit of a walk ahead of me with my bike and my backpack.  But, I made it with lots of time to set up my T-Zone and was very happy I had on my OTC shirt, because Simon's wife recognized me as I was leaving T-Zone.  I hung out for a bit with them, and borrowed some sunscreen, since I left mine in the car.  Such a lovely bunch! 

I had a huge jug of water with me, and managed to drink it and a bottle of Gatorade.  I found some shade and laid down to rest for a bit while waiting for the start of the race.  After a chat on the phone with my mom, my nerves finally settled and I felt ready to race.  A little warm-up and then I wandered over toward the start to wait for my wave.


  

Swim: Goal Time: 11:30, Actual Time: 11:30


It was an extremely warm day, and with our swim start at 2 pm, I expected that we wouldn't actually be allowed to wear wetsuits, so I left mine in the car and didn't even take it with me to transition.  An hour before the first sprint wave, they announced that wetsuits were allowed.  After a quick hesitation - "should I run up to the car to get it??" - I decided that the time that I would save in transition was worth more than wearing a wetsuit.  Plus I was already sweating and hot, and I knew that the water was significantly warmer than in Chicago. 

The swim had my very first beach start and I was completely unsure of what to do.  I positioned myself in the middle of the beach, right on the line.  When the horn sounded, I "sprinted" out into the water, then attempted to swim too soon.  After realizing that others were still running, I stood up and ran some more in the squishy, soft and very shallow water.  I finally got to swimming and settled into what felt like a reasonable pace.  The course was extremely well marked with lots of buoys, so I didn't actually sight very much, except to periodically check how much further I had to swim to the turn.  I managed to keep a steady pace and not have anyone around me to draft off of me, but that meant I didn't get to draft either. The water was really quite shallow, but I swam as far in as I could before running up the stairs two at a time.  I actually sprinted to the T-Zone and was so happy not to deal with a wetsuit!

T1: Time: 1:26


My fastest transition to date!! Whoohoo for no wetsuits! I chugged some warm Gatorade and only fumbled a little bit with my bike shoes.  (Swim time was also exactly the same as Chicago, but transition was way faster.)

Photo Credit: AthImage


Bike: Goal Time: 42:00, Actual Time: 42:13


Driving the course on Friday night had me extremely nervous for the bike portion, but I told myself I had to just kill it on the "flat" and straight parts of the course and take advantage of the downhills when I could, so that is what I attempted to do.  When I got on the course, I knew that there weren't that many women ahead of me, but I could already see some of the men starting their second loop. The first long gradual hill was killer and I wondered what I had gotten myself into.  Then came the crazy, technical part of the course.  I took the first downhill fast enough that I was able to almost make it up the other side (imagine a steep descent that immediately goes up just as steep...kind of like a rollercoaster), though I had to slow down significantly to keep from wiping out as we turned right and then turned left on the way up.  I took the rest of that part of the course very slow, even reassuring the volunteer at the turn with the mattresses in the ditch that she didn't need to t ell me to slow down.  After getting back to the "easier" part of the course, I was very happy to pick my speed up again.  Not much to report for the second loop, except that at the very end I almost missed the dismount line because 3 other people were getting there at the same time as me.  The official said, "that was close" to me and I nodded and ran away before he could decide that maybe I didn't get off my bike in time.  Needless to say, I'm quite thankful for Gatineau Park and the training that we've done there!


T2:  Time: 2:17


A bit of trouble with my running shoes, but overall another decent transition. Gulped some of the cold water that I had left (I really love my CamelBak Podium Chill insulated water bottle!!).

Photo Credit: AthImage

Run: Goal time: 22:30, Actual Time: 23:15


My only goal on the run was to leave everything out there.  I had been warned by one of the elite women that it was a tough, hot course with no shade, so to save something on the bike for the run.  Well, she was right. With the heat, I was so thankful for every single water station and for all the lovely people of Magog who had their sprinklers and hoses out along the run course!  My first mile felt pretty good, but then my pace started to slip on mile 2 and then a HUGE, killer hill popped out of nowhere.  I didn't remember seeing that when I mapped the course elevation on mapmyrun.com!  It was a brutal slog and the downhill wasn't very kind either.  But as I saw the 2 mile mark tick by on my Garmin, I told myself that this was my last chance and that I had to give it my all.  I picked up the pace, concentrating on getting the most out of each stride and picking people up ahead that I wanted to try to pass.  One of those girls that I passed had an "S-25" on her leg and I was happy that I started that game with myself.  My pace kept getting faster and my goal became to get it under 7:00/mile before the finish.  With 500 meters to go (thank you to those kind spectators who told me that!), I saw my pace dip to 6:57/mile!  With no one within catching distance I just focused on sprinting to the finish. 

Post-Race:


It was so nice to again run into Simon and family and to watch his daughter participate in her very first triathlon! Just the cutest thing ever.  I also ran into Linden (first place in his age group, what a rock star!), Jen and Lucie.  It is always so nice to see familiar faces post-race.  My Instagram friend Betty was timing the race and she came to find me in the athletes' area to let me know that my unofficial result was 3rd in my age group!  After waiting for what seemed like forever, with the excitement of it all, I actually ended up missing the awards, but Simon grabbed my bronze medal.  It is so exciting that all of the OTC crew that raced in Magog, both sprint and Olympic races, qualified for Worlds! What a great weekend, full of amazing performances!  I can confidently say that I left it all out there and I'm proud of the result.  Plus I had a lot of fun!  Again a HUGE thank you to everyone for sharing your knowledge and for your support!

Final Stats:


Place: 3/16 (age group), 31/223 (women), 120/466 (overall)
Time: 1:20:38.9

Swim: 11:30
T1: 1:26
Bike: 42:13
T2: 2:17
Run: 23:15

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Pre-race Rituals

Lots of athletes are superstitious.  I don't think that I'm superstitious, but I do like to have a routine and a few rituals before my races.  These things make me happy, comfortable, pump me up, and help to settle my nerves! With my race on Saturday, you better believe that I will be doing all of these things!

Painted Nails


Before every race, I paint my nails.  For some reason, I like to be able to look out at my hand during the swim and see my sparkly nails... even if that is the only thing that I can see!  I usually pick a color that means something - red to match my bike, purple (Chicago) to match my swim wave's caps, blue to match my trisuit, or maybe Barbie pink like in the picture above because I'm a girly girl!


Pre-Race Dinner: Chicken Parmesan



My favorite food of all time is Chicken Parmesan.  I happened to eat it before my first triathlon ever, and I've just stuck with it since. I usually skip the pasta in favor of veggies and try not to eat all that delicious cheese, because too much pasta and cheese makes my stomach upset (I know... carbo loading yada-yada). Here is my recipe for Chicken Parm.

 

Dreams of Glory


When I was about 11 years old, I went to my first Stanford Swim Camp.  Almost every day at camp, we watched "Dreams of Glory," a promotional video made by USA Swimming ahead of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta.  It features footage of swimmers like Pablo Morales, Jenny Thompson, and Amy Van Dyken all set to Van Halen's powerful song "Right Now." I made my parents buy me a VHS copy of the video and I watched it before every swim meet.  Thank goodness for YouTube, because now I watch it before every triathlon. I dare you not to be inspired and pumped up after watching this video!

Do you have any pre-race rituals? What do you eat the night before your race? Favorite pump-up jams? Tell me!

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Big Goals

I debated whether to post about my big goal for this season or not, because my goal race is this weekend (Trimemphre de Magog – Sprint AG Nationals). But I think it is important to set goals – really big ones – and to share them with others. I may be writing a post on Monday about how I didn’t achieve my big goal, but that is okay, because I firmly believe that the journey is just as important as the destination. Setting big goals motivates us to challenge ourselves, go outside our comfort zone, and grow as people and athletes. So, here it is:



My BIG goal for this season – to qualify for the Canadian Age Group World Championships Team! So I’m going to race at Magog, where there are 10 spots per age group, and I’m going to give it my all – leaving absolutely nothing on the course on Saturday.

I set the goal for myself after doing my first triathlon ever. Wait, really Kelsey?!?


Let’s talk about goal setting for a minute. 


When I set goals, I try to keep the SMART acronym in mind...

Specific:
• What are you going to do? What do you want to ultimately accomplish?
• How are you going to do it? Set out specific steps, break it into manageable pieces.

Measurable:
• Make sure your goal can be measured so that you can keep track of your progress.

Attainable:
• Is your goal within your own control and influence? Your goal should be a stretch, but it should be achievable within the allotted timeframe.

Realistic:
• This goes hand-in-hand with attainable goals. Your goal should be something you are physically capable of achieving.

Time-sensitive:
• This one is easy. Set an end date. Having a race to work toward is perfect.

So, my goal of making the team is specific. I can measure it by the times that I achieve over the course of the season. I knew that I needed to drop a lot of time on my bike, and I can measure that progress with my bike speed and my bike times in my races and practice. My goal is attainable, as long as I put in the work to get faster and as long as I race my heart out. My goal is realistic – I looked at previous times for qualifiers and I know what I need to do. Finally, my goal is time sensitive – race day is July 19.  I set a lot of small goals too that help me make progress toward my big goal and give me confidence as I work through my training.

Pursuing a big goal can be scary. It can be stressful. It can make you feel uncomfortable. That is why you have to remember that your #1 goal should actually be to have fun! If you aren't having fun and you aren't looking for happiness in the challenge, then you should reconsider your goals and you should reconsider your approach.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

My Summer 2014 Training Plan

Want a peek at my training schedule for this summer? I set myself a 12-week schedule in preparation for my "A race" at Magog this weekend.  I admit that I didn't quite stick to the schedule, but I tried my best given the curveballs that life threw my way over the past 12 weeks.  I like to keep my schedule pretty flexible, so that I can maintain some balance in life and adjust according to things like the weather, spending time with friends, and my need for rest!  My Tuesdays (track with HPS), Wednesdays (BRICK and strength with HPS), and Thursdays (swim with OTC) were the only days really set in stone and were often my hardest workouts of the week.

Sprint Triathlon Training Schedule - Spring/summer 2014


Week
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
1 (4/28)
Rest
Rest
Bike (30)
Rest
Run T (20)
Bike (45)
Swim T (30)
2 (5/5)
Rest
Run T (30)
Bike T (30)  
Swim (40)
Swim T (30)
Run (20)
Bike (60)
3 (5/12)
Run  (30)
Run T (30)
Bike (60)
Swim T (30)
Rest
Race Day!
Swim (40)
4 (5/19)
Rest
Bike T (45)
Run T (20)
Bike T (30)
Swim (20)
Rest
Run (40)
Bike T (30)
5 (5/26)
Rest
Run(40)
Bike T (35)
Swim (30)
Rest
Bike (60)
Run T (30)
6 (6/2)
Swim (45)
Run T (30)
Bike T (45)
Swim (10)
Rest
Run (45)
Bike (75)
7 (6/9)
Rest
Run (30)
Bike (55)
Swim (60)
Rest
Bike (90)
Run (50)
8 (6/16)
Rest
Bike T (45)
Run T (30)
Bike (75)
 
Run (20)
Swim (30)
Rest
Run (30)
Bike (90)
9 (6/23)
Swim (30)
Run T (45)
Bike (30)
Run (30)
Rest
S: 10
B: 10
R: 10
Race Day!
 
10 (6/30)
Run T (30)
Rest
Swim T (30)
Bike (90)
Run (60)
Swim (45)
Bike T (45)
11 (7/7)
Rest
Run
Bike
Swim
Run
Bike
Rest
12 (7/14)
Taper!
Bike (20)
run (10)
Run (20)
Swim (20)
Rest
S: 10
B: 10
R: 10
Race Day!!

Adapted from: Ottawa Triathlon Club, T= tempo

The OTC has a few sample training plans for every distance that are easily adaptable to your needs.  The club website has lots of other awesome resources for swimming, biking, and running! Check it out!